S4 E29: Analyzing The Simpsons

There are few cultural products that are as cross-cultural as The Simpsons, that have been translated to tens of languages…yet, they are at the same time a 100% American expression. We discuss this and other topics related to the most famous family of Springfield.

And since the Simpsons rose to worldwide fame in the 1990s, we take advantage to talk about that decade a bit, and discover the differences between teenage fun in Argentina and the US through the experiences of Dan and Fer.

Spanglish Playground: phrases from Martín Fierro, the most famous and quoted book in Argentina. We talk a bit about American equivalents and Dan reads like a Gaucho, in English.

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S4 E04: Being a woman is high-risk behaviour

On this show, the debut of our gender contributor, Vero, for a talk about where to draw the line between consent and assault when it comes to women and alcohol in environments like parties, boliches, college life.

Misuses, mistranslations of English in Argentina.

And we recall the shows of Guns N’ Roses and Nirvana in BA, back in the 1990s.

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S4 E03: The Boludo Emotivo and LA is NOT a World-class city

bacast403Boludo was chosen THE Argentine word…Agree?

We discuss what is a World-class city

And Scientology has made its arrival to Argentina!

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S4 E02: Sao Paulo better than BA?

Another episode in our new season, that brings you BA Cast both as a live show on www.radioledonline.com, Tuesdays at 8, and as a podcast.

On this program

Top 5 post-elections Deja Vus

A chamuyo about the role of Congress, vis-a-vis US and Argentina

And a song that attempts to explain what is Peronismo.

A discussion about Buenos Aires winning to award to best city in Latin America for the tenth straight year.

Spanglish Playground: Words and Phrases in English and Spanish that are impossible to translate such as Licenciado or Ultimate.

And some words on Halloween in Argentina

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S4 E01: Alive and Live on Radio Led

We’re back with our fourth season and now, in addition to being a podcast, we are a live show! On radioledonline.com, every tuesday at 8PM (Argie time).

For this episode we have:

Spanglish Playground: Cheto Words

Chamuyamos about Dan’s notes on his annual trip back home to Portland, OR.

And our guest is the most Argentinized Yanqui of all: THE Dustin Luke.

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S3 E18: Pedorro…How to translate that???

With the collaboration of our friends, journalist David Sommerstein and actor Feña Ortalli, we try to find a way to convey that concept.

Near the end of this short, we also go over a rating words scale, from “verga” to “diez puntos”.

Hope you enjoy it!

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S3 E16: The Best Game is…No Game.

For this variety show, we bring you a chamuyo with Jon K, a friend of Dan who was in BA for the second time recently and made some observations on Cost of Life, nightlife and courting at Bars.

Expat Chat with Joe, a listener who contacted us upon arriving recently to Argentina. We invited him to the studio!

Porteño in Use with the expression “Mandar Fruta”.

Spanglish Playground with lunfardo meanings of very common verbs.

And this season’s Spanish-language take on a hip-hop song.

Plus some Andean music for the Chau tume!

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S3 E13: Refranes, Dichos and Sayings (Spanglish Playground Special)

From “sobre gustos no hay nada escrito” to “con el carro en movimiento se acomodan los zapallos”, passing through…eerr…”pXXsy whipped”.

Guests: British author Daniel Tunnard and Argentine translator and tour guide, Analía Weiss.

 

 

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The Dedo Problem: Fingers Are Not Toes

I was looking at my fingers (dedos) today and I started thinking about how hard it is to say “De de dedo” which is the Spanish equivalent of “D as in dog”.

Why is it that my toes (dedos) have the same word as fingers in Spanish? They clearly have different uses. I cannot type with my toes for example and I cannot run on my hands.

I do understand that they are essentially analagous extremities and have ultimately the same bone structure. I also understand that it is common and frequent to use the modifier “de pie” when referring to toes (“dedos de pie”). But this is not always the case.

“Me cayo en el dedo” says an Argentine. So what does that mean? Did something fall on your finger or on your toe?

Then I started thinking about whether there is an English equivalent to this so called “dedo” problem. There is no body part in English that is like this except for cheeks. And ironically cheeks in Spanish (nalgas) are also used for both the cheeks on your face and butt cheeks.

So why is it that these two appendages which clearly have different functions and uses got the same name?

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